Favorite Post: 3 Great Disciple-Making Questions

Great disciple-making questions are naturally relational. They encourage conversation and deepen insight about each other. They are helpful in coaching, in leading disciples to discover and own personal assessment and next steps.

Before I share my three questions, I would love to hear questions you have found helpful in your disciple-making. Take a moment to Leave a Reply and share. I hope my questions remind you of other questions and encourage you in your disciple-making efforts.

Disciple-Making Questions

  • How can I pray for you and your family? You can find out so much in this one question. You can see the depth of trust and relationship, and you can discover what the individual believes about God. In addition, you can determine struggles and needs. I have found this to be a great question for use at every stage of disciple-making: when establishing a relationship with a lost person, when demonstrating care with a new Christian, and when teaching a disciple to demonstrate care in his/her own disciple-making efforts.
  • How has God been at work in your life this week? Again, responses to this question reveal much. Shallow responses may indicate disciples are moving through life with little sensitivity to God’s presence. Such responses may reveal untrained eyes, ears, and hearts for God’s interaction. Response testimonies focused on “me” may reveal immaturity while testimonies focused on God and others may reveal greater maturity.
  • What has God been teaching you through Bible study and prayer? While this is an accountability question which checks on daily quiet time practices and insight, it is so much more. This question also looks for personal relationship, listening, application, and obedience to God in His Word. Responses detailing passages without application tell much while responses focused on behavior without identifying scripture may not have long-lasting results.

Use good questions in your disciple-making. Ask open-ended questions to encourage thinking and processing. Ask caringly seeking more than facts or accountability. Try out these three questions if you are not already using them. Let me know how it goes! Make disciples!

Photo by Marcel Strauß on Unsplash

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